Climate change… we read about it everyday in newspaper… its impact can be felt more and more these days….. so is it really a big issue?

What can I do for my part to help address this issue? Well, first ,we Malaysians just won’t give up our cars…. because public transports is still in a sorry state. A car is a necessity. I remember many many years ago there was this TV ad urging us to carpool and not to drive single occupancy vehicle (SOV) but if you’re stuck in a traffic jam on any given day….you’ll notice everyone drive SOV.

Trust me, if public transport is better, I dont think many people would want to drive and what is the current average price for non-designated season parking in KL? I am currently being charge RM230.00 per month and my company is subsidising RM50.00 ONLY since the last seven years. When I first joined, the price was RM100/month. You do the math. So, for Malaysian government, the first thing they need to do if they want to do a part in addressing this issue is to take the cars off the roads. The more the better. Impose congestion fees so that fuckers who goes for a morning ride in downtown KL would be detered. Sometime it is because of these fuckers, there is  a crawl tailing it behind. Charging a heavy congestion fee is the only thing to ensure people dont drive around KL aimlessly and create traffic jam. The existing, light rail transit (LRT), monorail and KTM Komuter should be revamped and expanded. Just do something like Singapore’s MRT.

Any of you ever tried catching the LRT or monorail during rush hour? I gotta miss a 4-5 trains before I can get onboard one. Too much of people squeezing into a train and the train itself was already fully stuffed. Our monorail and LRT train is just too fucking short and small in size. Let me dare you: go and take the monorail on a weekday around 5.40pm at Raja Chulan, Bukit Bintang or Bukit Nenas station in Kuala Lumpur. That will be enough and lets not talk about the taxi and bus service yet at this point of time.

Ok, back to the climate change issue… with that kind of inconvenience to catch a train…. isn’t it a wise move to buy a car? For RM400 a month, you can reasonably own a Perodua Viva….. small and compact and easy to move around town… Monday to Sunday. The more cars on the road, create more traffic jam and more trees have to be chopped down to build more roads to cater these cars. More cars on the road means more risk i.e. risk of cars getting flooded, collision, loss of lives etc. More traffic jams will burn up a lot of fuel unnecessarily and this leads to carbon emission. Emission is ever increasing and there’s lesser trees to control carbon pollution. Then, we see a lot of changes in our climate as compared to a decade or two ago. Places that have never been flooded before in history got flooded… just look at the not-so-recent major flood in the state of Johor. We are getting more rain, drought, landslide etc in a year. The government then have to fork out money to help those affected by flood…. insurance companies and the financial market in a whole are the most unhappy one at time of such catastrophe… the government would just tai-chi some of its responsibilities to insurance companies i.e. they instructed insurance companies to pay for claims which otherwise is not their liability…. and the insurance fraternity obliged as to protect their operating license issued by the Central Bank. Cost is ever rising…

Who then are the happiest at time of catastrophe and loss? Well, go guess it.

So, everything is in a loop and related. The above is just one of the example that I can think of. If the root of the cause is tackled, then the rest of the things will not crop up. Right? Technically yes but there’s a “but”.

Even in the corporate level, companies can start to adopt paperless system which I think is a very small step but a big leap in helping to reduce trees being chopped.

Well, I hope something can be achieved in Copenhagen soon to address this issue.

Here’s something to ponder:

Westerners in the past drove cars, now they cycle to protect the environment. Asians on the other hand, cycled in the past as they have not much money to own a car then, are now driving cars of all sizes as they have money now.

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